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Our Foody Inspiration - Earthbound Honey

Posted by on September 26, 2018

Our Foody Inspiration - Earthbound Honey

 

In keeping with Bee Aware Month, our Foody Inspiration this month are sustainable artisan beekeepers - Earthbound Honey!

If you have been on one of our tours, you will know how much we love their honey and how good their honey is and if you haven't, we think it’s about time you did! Not only will you discover local Foody heros like Earthbound Honey but taste an almighty selection of delicious food whilst learning about our history, our people and our places.

 

Earthbound Honey is locally located in the Bethells Valley in north west Auckland on their 11 acre property with Pohutukawa groves, dense Manuka forests and wildflower pastures. Owners Terry and Karlene Toomey established Earthbound Honey in 2006 when Terry left his city-based job to become a beekeeper. Karlene soon followed reducing her hours as a landscape gardener and both now work on the farm together.

Their bees produce a range of honey from their Pohutukawa, Manuka and wildflower pastures.

If you are lucky enough to visit them at their base on one of our Our People, Our Places, Our Producers tours or at one of the local Farmer's Markets, you will see that it's not just honey that makes them one of our favourite Foody Inspirations, but it’s what they create with the honey and the wax from their bees. They also produce a wide range of skincare, honey vinegar, beeswax wraps and candles.

Fascinated? Join us on one of our Big Foody food tours and you too could be sampling this liquid gold!

 

Cuisine Magazine's Top 100 New Zealand Restaurants

Posted by Elle Armon-Jones on September 10, 2018

Cuisine Magazine have just announced their top 100 New Zealand restaurants for 2018. There are some classics and some newbies to the list! If you're looking for a great list of places to eat in New Zealand, this is the one to follow! We are delighted to see our friends and colleagues at Culprit, Bistronomy, Pacifica and The Hunting Lodge are on the list!

Check the list out below!

Cuisine Magazine's New Zealand Top 100 Restaurants 2018

Tastebud Tour named in World's Best Destination for Travel Experiences by TripAdvisor Travellers

Posted by Website Admin on September 10, 2018

How proud are we!!!!!!!! Our Tastebud Tour (Auckland Insider Tour: Food Tour with Local Expert) has been named in the World’s Best Destination for Travel Experiences according to TripAdvisor Travellers.

The Tastebud Tour has been the flagship experience since The Big Foody started back in 2010, designed especially to show the guests as much of the city as possible in the most delicious manner! Over 5000 guests have taken this tour since 2010 and we're delighted to still have two of the very first places we started with on the tour, Sabato and The Auckland Fish Market. 

Find out more here!

NZ featured in the World Ultimate Eats by Lonely Planet

Posted by on August 16, 2018

NZ featured in the World Ultimate Eats by Lonely Planet

In exciting news I was delighted to read the  World Ultimate Eats list released from Lonely Planet this year. Slowly but surely the world is discovering New Zealand as a food tourism destination and we're delighted to be leading this charge.
I am on the executive of EAT New Zealand which is a collective of chef, food writers, tour operators and event planners who as an organisation are dedicated to the promotion of New Zealand cuisine, so this result is awesome to see.

Nin's Bin in Kaikoura where you can buy fresh crayfish.

Sampling the City of Sails Smorgasbord

Posted by on August 14, 2018

Sampling the "City of Sails Smorgasbord"

We love showing off our city and it's hidden treasures.

A couple of weeks ago, we were honoured to host a group from the Otago Daily Times.

Check out the fantastic article that they wrote up about visiting Auckland and sampling the "City of Sails Smorgasbord"

Homemade Limoncello

Posted by on August 14, 2018

Homemade Limoncello

 

INGREDIENTS
 

5 lemons - washed (you can also subsittute limes if you wish)

1 ½ cups castor sugar

350ml vodka (don’t buy the cheapest, you will notice the difference)

375ml water

 

INSTRUCTIONS

 

Peel the lemons and place the peel and the peeled lemon (cut into cubes) into a large bowl.

Add the castor sugar and water into a pot and place over an element until the sugar has dissolved. Let the sugar syrup cool.

Add the cooled sugar syrup to the lemons and lemon peel.

Add the vodka and stir gently.

Cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge to allow to infuse for at least 48 hours.

Strain the liquid through a sieve discarding the peel and the lemons.

Using a funnel, pour the liquid into bottles and store in the fridge.

Serve well chilled over ice.

To Biddy

Posted by Elle Armon-Jones on July 18, 2018

When I started The Big Foody, one of the most exiting things that I knew would happen was meeting the people behind the foods that we talked about. I have travelled the length and breadth of the country meeting people over the last 8 years and each and everyone of them has been fabulous. But it was Biddy Fraser-Davies who I wanted to meet the most.

From the first time Calum at Sabato gave me her cheese to try, to watching her on Country Calendar, hearing her plight against the monsters at MPI and speaking to her on the phone, she was a character I just wanted to spend some time with.

As much as we loved Biddy at The Big Foody, we loved her cows too. Biddy didn’t start making cheese until she was given her first house cow Gwendoline 15 years ago. Now Patsy, Dizzy, Holly, Isabel, Nellie, Nora and Lilly were all names of cows, I have photos of on my phone. In 2014 Biddy’s cheese won a super gold award at the World Cheese Awards in London! From the social metropolis of Eketahuna, in New Zealand, that cheese rocked the awards.

Earlier this year we had our fab group of 20, on a tour passing through Eketahuna and last minute I called Biddy to ask whether we could pop in. In true Biddy style she told me off for arranging our tour on a Monday when she was making cheese and couldn’t talk to us, but there she was at the end of the path waiting to welcome us to Cwmglynn and tell us her story.

We met the cows that have been part of our tours for years, saw the infamous model railway, chatted with Colin and Biddy and of course tried the cheese. When I got back on the bus with the group, a big part of me wanted to just jump off again and go and hang out some more. But driving away there was a very special feeling of “that was awesome!”

Biddy died last Friday unexpectedly and when Calum told me on Saturday I sat down and cried. Why? Because in the 4 or so years I have talked about Cwmglynn farmhouse cheese to our guests, I have learnt what tenacity, determination and standing up for your cause really meant. Because of Biddy, I have learnt more about making cheese, storing cheese, maturing cheese, Eketahuna (!) and keeping it real and authentic, than I have from anyone else.

God bless you Biddy, thank you for everything, I will miss you greatly.

 

Elle

 

The Big Foody PDX Featured in Iwanowski's Travel Blog

Posted by Laura Morgan on July 13, 2018

We recently hosted German Travel Guide writers, Dr. Margit Brinke and Dr. Peter Kränzle on our Portland Makers Walking Tour and they wrote about it on Iwanowski's Travel Blog! Dr's Brinke and Kränzle are two of the coolest human beings on the planet and it was so interesting to learn that where they came from in Bavaria is similar in values and culture to Portland and the Pacific Northwest. They ride bikes everywhere, toil away in community gardens during summer and are serious about good beer. 

Read their story here: Excursion to Foodie Town

If you speak German (or even if you don't) please check out their blog (and Iwanowski's Travel Guides to the USA) and come visit us in Portland!

 

 

 

 

 

Honoring the Life of Anthony Bourdain

Posted by Laura Morgan on July 05, 2018

Honoring the Life of Anthony Bourdain

 

This writing will probably go out on or near the day Anthony Bourdain would have been 62 years old. Even though it’s been a couple weeks since news of his death woke me up on that strange Friday morning, and I never knew him personally, I still feel heartbroken at having written that first sentence. Why is that? More important, why is it that so many of you in “the industry” were also so affected by this tragedy?

 

Speaking for myself, Tony changed everything when he debuted on the Food Network late in my high school years. On ‘A Cook’s Tour’ he was eating his way through Asia, meeting people and participating in food rituals that were so far from my own frame of reference – so far from anything that I had ever experienced. I was blown away and immediately knew that’s what I wanted to do with my life. From that point forward, everything I’ve done is to put me one step closer to experiencing and learning from those food cultures that are foreign to me, as well as appreciating and learning more about my own. Admittedly, I read Kitchen Confidential shortly after that (and then anything else I could get my hands on) and again I realized - those are my people! That is where I belong! Everything he said appealed to me, which is why I pivoted my focus in college and work, into the food industry. I’ve done a lot of different jobs in “food,” but I’ve never desired to leave the industry since. I realized from mourning that I’m still as excited about discovery and driven by food as he made me all those years ago when I heard his voice on TV and in books for the first time.

 

I know now that most people in food feel the same. I haven’t heard from one person who wasn’t deeply affected by Tony’s passing. Whether it was A Cook’s Tour or Kitchen Confidential, or No Reservations or some other work, he spoke to people, whatever their language, in a way they could understand. If you’re a cook, it was with camaraderie - a grueling, but loved, shared experience. If you were a traveler, it was with poetry that kinda perfectly expressed the indescribable-ness of a person or a place. I guess what I’m trying to say is Tony gave a voice, demonstrated respect for people, especially frequently marginalized people, encouraged cultural reciprocity, and in doing so, made this a better place for all of us. I hope he knew that.